Foaming Frankenstein Heads: Fun Halloween Science Experiment

Reactions Science Experiment for Kids

A friend gifted me with a set of these fun Frankenstein head containers and I knew I needed to use them for a science experiment of some kind. They came from the dollar store so they should be pretty easy to find if you want the same or similar containers.

Ingredients for foaming Frankenstein experiment: Frankenstein container, baking soda, vinegar and food dye.For this experiment you will need baking soda (not baking powder!) and vinegar. Adding food colouring is fun but optional if you don’t have any, it won’t affect the reaction. I used about half a cup of vinegar, and added it to the container first, then mixed in a few drops of food dye. After it was mixed together I added in a heaping tablespoon of baking soda. If you are using a larger container, or just want a foamier reaction you could add in some dish washing soap too.

If you are doing this science experiment with younger children you can talk about the ingredients and ask them to predict what will happened when you mix the ingredients together. For older children you could have them repeat the experiment a few times, having them use a different set up each time. Have them try using a larger amount of vinegar with a smaller amount of baking soda, food dye versus no food dye, adding dish soap in, or have them come up with their own hypothesis to try out.

Baking soda and vinegar creating foam coming out of Frankenstein's headThe reaction happened quickly after adding in the baking soda!

Frankenstein head with foaming reactionIt was very difficult to get a photo of the reaction! I redid the experiment and made a video of the reaction, using a screenshot of the video for this photo. If you’re doing this experiment with older children, you could have one child act as the recorder, using photos, filming, notes or a combination.

Big reaction- Frankenstein head covered in foamI love this photo, such a fun picture of Frankenstein’s eye peeking out from the vinegar and baking soda reaction.

End of Foaming Frankenstein head reactionThe foam quickly fizzled back into liquid. Next time I try this, I’ll add some liquid dish soap in as well and see if it makes the reaction last longer.

Have you tried this? What’s your favourite science experiment or activity to do using baking soda and vinegar?

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Monster Slime Sensory Bag

Monster Eyes Sensory Bag

I love October! Halloween has always been one of my favourite holidays and when October hits I start looking at everything through a Halloween coloured lens. So when I saw these fun coloured googly eyes at the dollar store my first thought was that they look like monster eyes. I decided to create a monster eye sensory bag with them.

Ingredients for monster slime: hair gel, ziploc bag and googly eyes.

The ingredients you will need to create a monster eyes sensory bin is a ziploc bag, googly eyes, hair gel and tape. The cheapest hair gel I found was blue but if you have clear hair gel you can add food colouring or liquid water colours for colour.

Layering the hair gel and googly eyes in the ziploc bag.

I found that it was easiest to put in small amounts of the ingredients at a time, and to layer them to make it easier to mix them up. Once the bag is sealed you can have the kids help you mix the googly eyes into the hair gel by squeezing the bag with their hands.

Finished bag of monster slime

This is what the finished monster eyes sensory bag looked like once it was finished. You may want to tape the sensory bag shut with packing tape or duct tape, especially if you have younger children or extra curious children.

Monster slime sensory bag against sunlit window.

After squishing, squeezing and poking the sensory bag, we taped it to the window to see what it would look like. The monster eyes sensory bag would also be fun to use on top of a light box if you have one, but the window allowed light to come through the hair gel, making it “look like we were under water”.

Monster eyes sensory bag is a quick, cheap and easy way to explore texture and a fun open ended activity sensory activity as an alternative to a water or sand bin.

Have you made a similar sensory bag? Tell me in the comments!

 

 

 

 

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Happy Thanksgiving

Here’s a round up of some of my favourite things for Thanksgiving.

baby boys first thanksgiving outfit baby boys first thanksgiving shirt my first thanksgiving outfit boys first turkey day shirt outfit
My First Thanksgiving outfit via The Little Queen Bee on Etsy. Such a cute way to celebrate your baby’s first Thanksgiving!

A Thankful String via Parenting. This craft makes a pretty Thanksgiving decoration but also gets everyone thinking on what makes each of them thankful.

Thanksgiving Bingo Game! Includes 12 game cards, calling cards, and call sheet. Instant Digital DownloadThanksgiving Bingo via Lilacs and Charcoal on Etsy. This would make a great way to keep the kids entertained while the meal is being cooked.

Franklin's Thanksgiving

Franklin’s Thanksgiving by Paulette Bourgeois and Brenda Clark. A classic children’s book about Thanksgiving.

Kids Thanksgiving Shirt Toddler Girl Thanksgiving Outfit Thankful Shirt Thanksgiving Clothes for Kids Children's Thanksgiving Shirt 009

Love this simple but sweet Thanksgiving kids shirt via Bump and Beyond Designs on Etsy.

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Thanksgiving on Thursday by Mary Pope Osborne. Part of the Magic Treehouse series, a great Thanksgiving book for middle grade readers.

Pine cone turkey decoration via Parenting. Have the kids go for a walk to find some pine cones and turn them into decorations for the dinner table later in the day.

 

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Best Board Books for Fall

 

Exposure to words and books help a toddler’s pre literacy skills grow. However, every parent and caregiver knows the frustration of having books ripped apart by curious hands soon ater they have been bought! Luckily more and more baby and toddler appropriate books are being published in board book format. It used to be fairly difficult to find good board books but now you can find board books in a wide range of topics. Here’s some of the best baby and toddler board books for Fall or Autumn.

Baby Loves Fall book by Karen Katz

Baby Loves Fall by Karen Katz. This book is a lift the flap book, which helps gets kids interested in the story and stay engaged while being read to. It also gives them something to explore while interacting with the book on their own.

 

Mouse's First Fall board book by Lauren Thompson

Mouse’s First Fall by Lauren Thompson. Perfect for fans of the other Mose books, this book is a fun introduction to the Fall season.

In My Path board book by Sara Gillingham

In My Patch by Sara Gillingham. This book is one of my favourites. It has die cut pages that give multiple layers to the book and really add to the illustrations. The mouse in the middle is also a finger puppet that you can use to help tell the story to your little one.

Fall toch and feel book by Roger Priddy

Fall by Roger Priddy. This book is a touch and feel book, which adds extra interest to the story and is a fun way to encourage a child to explore books.

 

Pumpkin Soup board book by Helen Cooper

Pumpkin Soup by Helen Cooper. This is one of my favourite books about Fall in board book or picture book form. Actually it’s probably one of my favourite children’s books in general. The story is beautifully written and the illustrations are so cozy that you wish you were hanging out in the little house with the cat and the squirrel and the duck. I’m so pleased that it comes in board book form because it means I can share it with younger children without worry about ripped or missing pages. Definitely a book to buy for your toddler, preschooler or school age child!

 

Physical activity for kids is important, and other links.

Statcan studies highlight importance of physical activity for children. via City News. To anyone who has ever parented a child, taught a child, cared for a child, or met a child this will not come as a surprise.

Prince William and Kate to deliver book written in rare native tongue to indigenous children via The Star

Giant Teddy Bear Perfectly Sums Up Why Grandparents Shouldn’t Buy Gifts via Scary Mommy. I always wondered who actually bought those!

Discover your Patronus via Pottermore. The first time I tried it, it said I was too slow. Apparently I’m an Osprey.

Etihad launches new children’s activity packs via Trade Arabia. That’s not all- “For guests flying long-haul, every aircraft is staffed by a Flying Nanny”. The best way to fly with children! Every single flight anywhere should be staffed with a Flying Nanny. Imagine flying on a plane where the kids were given special meals, activity packs and entertained by a nanny? I’d pay extra for a flight like that.

First Day of Fall Painting

As much as I will miss the fun of summer, I do really enjoy Fall (or Autumn as some may say). For the first day of Fall I thought I’d show how to do a tape resist painting in Fall colours.

This is a great activity because it is very process based, the child doing the activity can choose what paint to use, how much, where to put it, what types of brush strokes to use etc. At the end of it though, you also end up with a nice project that you can display.

Materials for Fall painting
Materials for the Fall painting

I used a handmade textured brush but you can use a regular paint brush, foam brush or even have the kids paint with their fingers.

Starting to tape the canvas.
Starting to tape the canvas.

Use tape to section off areas of the canvas. You can use masking tape or painters tape,  whichever you have on hand. Older kids can do this part themselves but younger kids may require you to give them pieces of pre cut tape or put the tape down for them for the youngest ones.

Finished taping the canvas.
Finished taping the canvas.

This is more or less what the canvas will look like when you’ve finished taping it. You can do a geometric pattern or make it more random. For a fall painting it would also be neat to create a tree trunk and branches out of the tape.

Starting to paint the canvas.
Starting to paint the canvas.

I chose red and yellow paint because they would mix to create orange. Using primary colours would also be good to teach colour mixing, or you could use favourite colours, colours to match a season or theme or whatever you have on hand ūüėČ

Finished painting.
Finished painting.

Here’s the toddler completed painting. He was really interested in applying a lot of paint to one fairly circular area.

Completed painting.
Completed painting.

Here’s the end result! A Fall coloured tape resist painting for the first day of Fall ūüôā

Book News Round Up

I’m counting down the days until Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children comes out on September 30th! I can’t wait to see this, although as with any book that’s been turned into a movie I’m worried it won’t live up to my expectations. What are your thoughts on books vs. movies? Do you feel the movie generally does a good job of representing the book or do you have to think of them as two separate entities?

11 Children’s Books That Help Kids Understand Autism via Romper

Excerpts from Chris Hadfield’s New Children’s Book via The Star

The Darkest Dark is about Chris Hadfield’s childhood fear of the dark and how he was able to get over it. This is on my TBR list for sure. I was lucky enough to see Chris Hadfield present on his life and journey to space and he seems like such a genuinely nice person with amazing stories to tell. Plus the illustrations by the Fan Brothers look fantastic!

An Illustration from The Darkest Dark by Chris Hadfield, illustrated by the Fan Brothers and showing a boy and a dog on a bed surrounded by spaceships, a planet and a whale.
Illustration from The Darkest Dark

Locke Street Festival Finds

Last weekend was both the Locke Street Festival as well as SuperCrawl in Hamilton. Lots of food trucks, art, concerts and entertainment. I wanted to quickly share a couple of my favourite finds from the weekend.

 

Cover of Edgar and the Treehouse of Usher by Jennifer AdamsFrom the book sale at Epic Books I bought Edgar and the Treehouse of Usher by Jennifer Adams. It looks like such a fun book and I can’t wait to review it.

 

Along a Long Road by Frank VivaMy other find was Along a Long Road by Frank Viva, found at the Hamilton Public Library’s sidewalk sale. I love the simple story and the illustrations in this book, especially how they used a contrasting texture for the road so that the children can follow it along with their fingers.

I was very excited to find these gems and add them to my collection! What great books (children’s or otherwise) have you added to your collection recently?

Hippopotamister by John Patrick Green

John Patrick Green Hippopotamister Blog Tour

Welcome to the Hippopotamister blog tour!

Hippopotamister by John Patrick GreenSynopsis

The zoo isn’t what it used to be. It’s run-down and falling apart. Hippo hardly ever gets any visitors. So he decides to set off for the outside with his friend Red Panda. To make it in the human world, Hippo will have to become a Hippopotamister: he’ll have to act like a human, get a job, and wear a hat as a disguise. He’s a good employee, whether he’s a construction worker, a hair stylist, or a sous chef. But what he really needs is a job where he can be himself.

Drawing of a hippo as an artist.

Review

I really loved Hippopotamister! It would be such a fun book to read aloud. Many times with comics and graphic novels the text alone doesn’t give you enough of the story, which makes¬†reading them aloud less fun, but Hippopotamister’s story is so well written¬†that it would be a good book for reading aloud.

Hippopotamister is a sweet and encouraging story that has strong¬†messages about being true to yourself and persevering. I also really liked the way the zoo was written about. As someone who loves animals, I was a little nervous when I saw that a zoo was one of the locations in the book but I was very happy to see the correlation shown between a well maintained, caring zoo and happy and healthy animals!¬†I loved that the book had such positive messages in it in addition to the story, it’s not written in a heavy handed way. It would tie in well to discussions of character traits and being a good citizen,¬†and would make a wonderful addition to any child’s or classroom’s library.

You can buy Hippopotamister here, or visit the Good Reads page for Hippopotamister here.

Don’t forget to check out the other blogs on the tour!

May 10, 2016: Perusing Pages
May 11, 2016: Pages Unbound
May 12, 2016: Melanie Hays
May 13, 2016: Midwestern Book Nerd
May 14, 2016: Charmingly Simple
May 15, 2016: Novel Cravings
May 16, 2016: Bookish Babes
May 17, 2016: Bumbles and Fairy-Tales
May 18, 2016: Book Stacks Amber
May 19, 2016: Lyseofllyr
May 20, 2016: M & Em Read
May 21, 2016: Trisha Jenn Reads
May 22, 2016: Twirling Book Princess
May 23, 2016: The Whimsical Mama
May 25, 2016: The Vivacious Hobo
May 26, 2016: Fangirl Confessions
May 27, 2016: The Plot Bunny
May 28, 2016: Reading With Cupcakes
May 29, 2016: Hermit Librarian
May 30, 2016: The Kindred Reader
May 31, 2016: Polished Page Turners

Hippo wearing a chef hat from Hippopotamister by John Patrick Green

I received a free copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for my honest review.

Review: Elliot by Julie Pearson and Manon Gauthier

Elliot book written by Julie Pearson and illustrated by Manon GauthierElliot written by Julie Pearson and illustrated by Manon Gauthier is a picture book about a little rabbit named Elliot whose family does not know quite how to take care of him. Although they try on their own, they need some outside help and a social worker comes to help educate them while bringing Elliot to stay with a different family.

Generally when I think of stories that talk of foster care or other situations that can be difficult to explain to children I think of those horrifying, cheesy picture books that can usually be found in the parenting section of the library, but Elliot is just a gentle and heartwarming storybook that happens to deal with the foster care system and adoption. The muted colours of the collage illustrations match the tone of the book and support the story well. The text manages to tell of a difficult situation without being down, depressing or preachy, kudos to Julie Pearson for managing that!

While Elliot would be a nice addition to any bookshelf, this would be a beautiful book to give to a child who is entering the foster care system or who is moving towards having their adoption finalized.